First Solutionaries Congress Held

Tyler Herrera points to a solution in his team's presentation.

Tyler Herrera points to a solution in his team’s presentation.

The first Solutionaries Congress was held at Maeser Preparatory Academy in Lindon, Utah, last week on April 19. The event was a gathering of high school students who presented proposed solutions to some of the world’s pressing problems in competition format similar to a debate meet. In all, 34 students pioneered presenting at the competitive event representing four different high schools in nine teams.

The term “solutionaries” is most closely associated with Zoe Weil, co-founder and President of the Institute for Humane Education, an international organization devoted to creating a peaceful, just, and sustainable world through education. Ms. Weil forwarded the term in a well-known speech for the TED conference in 2011. Simply put, solutionaries are people who transform unjust, unsustainable, and inhumane systems into ones that are peaceful and healthy for all people, animals, and the environment. The Institute for Humane Education sponsored the event with funding from the Pollination Project, a nonprofit organization that makes seed grants to change-makers across the world.

Connor Richards, Lexie Sheffield, Matthew Christiansen and Andrew Hull from Lone Peak High School proudly display the 1st Place trophy.

Connor Richards, Lexie Sheffield, Matthew Christiansen and Andrew Hull from Lone Peak High School proudly display the 1st Place trophy.

The winners of the event were from Lone Peak High School with their presentation of how a variety of medical ills can be solved by using research that has come to light with the human genome project. In second place, a team from Carbon High School in Price presented solutions to space allocations due to overpopulation. Another team from Lone Peak High School captured third place with their presentation on using hydrogen fuel to help solve the energy crisis. Other topics from the student teams addressed solutions to the energy crisis by way of space-based solar power, faulty ACT exam paradigms, economic inequality, health insurance, the education crisis, and inhumane treatment of certain peoples in India.

Trophies for the event were commissioned from artist Michael Bingham, an artist in Logan, Utah and also a high school teacher himself in Mountain Crest High School’s art department. They were made from recycled metal and then stuffed with recycled toys like one would find in a fast food meal (and quickly thrown away). The materials and methods of construction seemed to echo the themes of the congress and provided an interesting supporting commentary on the event. “These are the coolest things I have ever seen!” exclaimed one student.

2nd Place team members Jason Truman, Mark Larsen, Garret Haeck, Tyler Jannoud, DaNell Rasmussen and Morgan Johnson from Carbon High School.

2nd Place team members Jason Truman, Mark Larsen, Garret Haeck, Tyler Jannoud, DaNell Rasmussen and Morgan Johnson from Carbon High School.

3rd Place Winners from Lone Peak HIgh School: Haley Maloney, Savanna Free and Alec Day.

3rd Place Winners from Lone Peak HIgh School: Haley Maloney, Savanna Free and Alec Day.

“When we first began planning this event,” explained Dr. David Sidwell, the event’s Director, “we thought students would see a problem in their community like stray dogs or people on the streets, or we thought they might look at a village in Africa and figure out how to clean their water or something. But they thought much bigger! It was kind of fun to see them do so much research and come up with such compelling arguments.”

“I think it was a great experience to look at the world and all its problems and look at how we as a team could come up with a solution,” claimed Madison Alleman, a debate student from Carbon High School, “Usually in debate, we just talk about problems, but in this case, we had to actually come up with a solution.”

Christian Johnson points to some research his team did on the injustices of the ACT exam.

Christian Johnson points to some research his team did on the injustices of the ACT exam.

Debate coach John Haws from Lone Peak High School felt similarly: “They started solving problems rather than just debate them. They started focusing on how to make a difference.”

“I feel the kids did a tremendous job in putting together the research required to communicate feasible solutions,” said Riquel Dunn, one of the judges. Another judge, Tim Platzek, remarked, “It was pretty dang interesting to see how these kids could take a problem and how to fix it and account for the budget and other resources required.”

Paul Maloy, a debate coach from Legacy Preparatory Academy in Woods Cross, described the method his school took to bring a team down. “I selected only a few students from my large class of kids to represent the school,” he said, “then all the other kids ended up being researchers for this team. They would go find relevant information and do a lot of legwork for the team, and then the team had to sift through all of this material to distill what was needed for the presentation. It was really marvelous to see the teamwork involved.”

Spencer Lee, Zane Yarborough and Layna Lamborne begin their presentation about space-based solar power as a solution to the energy crisis.

Spencer Lee, Zane Yarborough and Layna Lamborne begin their presentation about space-based solar power as a solution to the energy crisis.

The event, the first of its kind, went off well, but not without a few hitches.

“We gave each team 30 minutes to present, but most teams only used 15 – 20 minutes,” explained Dr. Sidwell, “Also, our judges were really great to judge, but an event like this is so objective, we really had to come up with creative ways to score the teams after they presented. In the end, there was only a few points difference between the highest and lowest scoring teams. We felt that was a good sign that we had calculated things pretty well. With any first time event—especially a competitive one—you really have to rely on people’s forgiveness and latitude for things going wrong or going in a direction different from what one would expect. Luckily, everyone was very willing to accommodate new ideas and methods.”

Joseph Sheikh answers a question at the end of his presentation.

Joseph Sheikh answers a question at the end of his presentation.

In the end, both the students and the coaches wanted to do it again and look forward to next year. Discussions with the Institute for Humane Education may lead to a national competition in the not too distant future. “We’ll collect critiques and comments from the participants, coaches and judges and come up with an amazing event next year,” promised Cindy Sidwell, a debate coach from Maeser Preparatory Academy and Assistant Director of the event, “This year was really fun, and we learned a lot. Now we can really make it fantastic for the future.”

Zane Yarborough elucidates his team's views on energy.

Zane Yarborough elucidates his team’s views on energy.

Alec Day points to some statistics supporting his team's views on the energy crisis.

Alec Day points to some statistics supporting his team’s views on the energy crisis.

Savanna Free relaxes for a moment during her team's presentation.

Savanna Free relaxes for a moment during her team’s presentation.

Madison Alleman presents some facts about the ACT exam.

Madison Alleman presents some facts about the ACT exam.

Christian Johnson and Joseph Sheikh begin their team's presentation.

Christian Johnson and Joseph Sheikh begin their team’s presentation.

Alec Day, Haley Maloney and Savanna Free pose in front of a cost comparison.

Alec Day, Haley Maloney and Savanna Free pose in front of a cost comparison.

Solutionary pioneer Tyler Herrera.

Solutionary pioneer Tyler Herrera.

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Evaluation

Evaluation

Hello Friends,

We have put together some evaluation items that judges will be scrutinizing closely. As the April 19 event approaches, you may want to take a close look at these yourself! Since many of these items have already been described on this site in some detail, these should not be too surprising.

  1. The Need
    1. The need for a solution was established effectively.
  2. The Presentation:
    1. The presentation was clear, compelling and convincing.
    2. Printed materials were clear, compelling and convincing.
  3. Research
    1. The quality of research completed informs this project effectively.
    2. A sufficient number and variety of quality sources was consulted.
  4. Activities
    1. The programs and activities required to fulfill this project seem realistic and operable.
    2. The resources required (funds, people, materials, etc.) could be acquired as communicated.
    3. The timeline seems realistic and operable.
  5. Budget
    1. The budget (revenues and expenditures) seems realistic and operable.

 

Registration Deadline Coming Up Soon!

register

Hey all, registration for the 1st ever Solutionaries Congress, taking place at Maeser Preparatory Academy in Pleasant Grove, Utah, is Feb. 18.

Please see the REGISTER page and send us your information ASAP!

Thanks again for your ideas that keep coming. We’re keeping things pretty simple this year, but your ideas will help us immensely in the future!

Warm regards,

David

Lots of Inquiries!

We have received a lot of inquiries about fees, dates, team sizes and so forth, and I hope we have updated the site to reflect answers to these questions. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to contact me personally:

David Sidwell: dr.davidsidwell (at) gmail.com

It sounds like we have some great ideas! Keep ’em coming!

Utah: Site for Pilot Solutionaries Congress

Press Release

From:          David Sidwell, Institute for Humane Education

To:              All Media

Subj:          Solutionaries Congress

Utah Chosen as Site for Solutionaries Congress

The Institute for Humane Education, a national organization devoted to creating a more humane world, has selected Utah to be the place of their first Solutionaries Congress. This promises to be an event like no other, gathering teams of high school students to accomplish an amazing thing…

They will save the world.

Utah teachers of grades 8 – 12 are invited to participate by gathering “Solutionary Teams” who will present ideas for solving the world’s problems at the Congress, which will be held on (or near) April 20, 2013 (site to be decided). The ideas presented can address local, regional or even global issues such in education, the environment, human rights and more.  Leaders at the Institute for Humane Education (IHE) have their eye on Utah, hoping to learn much in preparing for a larger national event in Washington DC in subsequent years.

“It’s such a privilege to work with the Institute for Humane Education, especially Zoe Weil, whose speeches on YouTube have caused an optimistic fervor about the purposes of education,” explained the Solutionaries Congress Director, David Sidwell, a resident of River Heights, Utah and adjunct professor at Utah State University. “I think Utah has gained a reputation for having outstanding students who really want to help the world be a better place.”

Educational strategists and policy makers often insist that one of the main goals of education is to prepare learners for the world of work and to help them become engaged, knowledgable citizens. The Institute for Humane Education, however, goes well beyond this:

“The problem is, that purpose of schooling is too small,” explained IHE President Zoe Weil. “We need a bigger vision for the purpose of schooling.” Education, in her mind, should be to “graduate a generation of solutionaries who have the tools, creativity and motivation to solve the world’s problems.” In so doing, successful learners inherently become effective citizens, leaders, parents, artists, policy-makers, business owners, teachers and more. The hope is that these students will then continue this life-long pursuit of learning and doing good in the world.

“This Solutionaries Congress is an attempt at doing just that.” declared Sidwell.

The skills required for learner success, Sidwell explained, are naturally developed as students research, collaborate, create and communicate solutions that will make our world a more humane, healthy place to live.

Using “most good, least harm” practices espoused by the Institute for Human Education, students learn to create a caring, humane world while developing vital skills they will need in all areas of curriculum from arts and biology to zoology, from language arts to math and science and beyond. Personal and professional skills include effective researching, writing, public speaking, problem solving, consensus building, conflict resolution and collaboration, cooperation and others, all in a practical, engaging and authentic context.

To find out more information about the Solutionaries Congress, or to express interesting gathering a team together, you may contact David Sidwell: dr.davidsidwell (at) gmail.com .